Friday Fellow: ‘Ladislau’s Flatworm’

ResearchBlogging.orgby Piter Kehoma Boll

Friday fellow is back!

After almost a year, I decided to go on with it. Actually, I interrupted it because of several other activities that were requiring my attention. Now let’s move on!

Today I will present to you another land planarian, and one I particularly like. Its binominal name is Obama ladislavii (formerly Geoplana ladislavii) and, as most land planarians, it does not have a popular name, although I suggest it to be ‘Ladislau’s Obama’ or ‘Ladislau’s Flatworm’. Now who is Ladislau?

Well, let’s first take a look at how this species was first described.

The Ladislau’s Flatworm was described in 1899 by the zoologist Ludwig von Graff in his famous monograph, “Monographie der Turbellarien”. Graff described it based on specimens sent to him from southern Brazil by the zoologist Hermann von Ihering, as well as on other specimens collected by the biologist Fritz Müller.

By the time Ihering and Müller were collecting specimens in Brazil, a botanist named Ladislau de Souza Mello Netto was the director of the Brazilian National Museum in Rio de Janeiro. He actually hired them as traveling naturalists, so we can say that he was the responsible for them being able to collect specimens in Brazil.

As a result, when describing this new planarian species, Graff decided to call it ladislavii in honor of Ladislau Netto. At least I think so! I did not find any reference to that, as Graff did not explain the etymology of the name in the description. However, whom else would ladislavii be referring to?

Now that we explained the name, it is time to talk about the worm itself.

Ladislau’s flatworm is found in southern Brazil’s states of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina and is easily recognized by its green color. The larger specimens can measure more than 10 cm in length and more than 1 cm in breadth while creeping, so it is a considerably large planarian for the local standards.

Obama ladislavii in all of its greenness. Photo by Piter K. Boll*

Obama ladislavii in all of its greenness. Photo by Piter K. Boll*

Most land planarians are found either in very well preserved ecosystems, for example, inside undisturbed forests, or in very well disturbed ecosystems, such as gardens and urban parks. Now we can find the Ladislau’s flatworm living very well both in a natural paradise in the middle of a dense forest as well as in that small garden beside a very busy street. How is that possible?

The life history of many land planarian species is completely unknown, so that we do not even know what they eat. They are recognized as important predators of other invertebrates, but that is not enough, as being a predator does not mean that you eat anything that moves, right?

Until recently, we knew very little about the Ladislau’s flatworm, but I started to study it along with other species in the last years and so now we at least have an idea of what it eats, and the answer is: Gastropods, i.e., slugs and snails!

We usually found gastropods in gardens, parks, plantations and everywhere humans plant something, so they are an available meal for the Ladislau’s flatworm. It feeds on many of those annoying little pests you may find in your garden, including the garden snail (Helix aspersa), the Asian trampsnail (Bradybaena similaris), and the marsh slug (Deroceras laeve).

Obama ladislavii and one of its snacks, the snail Bradybaena similaris

Obama ladislavii and one of its snacks, the snail Bradybaena similaris. Photo by Piter K. Boll*

The Ladislau’s flatworm can follow the slime trail left by the gastropod in order to find and capture it. The most efficient way for the planarian to subjugate the prey is by surrounding it with its body and using muscular power, not very different from what a constrictor snake does.

Considering its taste for those pests, the Ladislau’s flatworm seems to be a good item to have in your garden, right? Yes, but only if you live in southern Brazil. Exporting it to other areas can lead to catastrophic results, as the case you can read here.

– – –

References:

Boll, P., & Leal-Zanchet, A. (2014). Predation on invasive land gastropods by a Neotropical land planarian Journal of Natural History, 1-12 DOI: 10.1080/00222933.2014.981312

Graff, L. v. 1899. Monographie der Turbellarien. II. Tricladida Terricola. Engelmann, Leipzig, 574 p.

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1 Comment

Filed under Behavior, Ecology, Friday Fellow, Zoology

One response to “Friday Fellow: ‘Ladislau’s Flatworm’

  1. Pingback: Obama invades Europe: “Yes, we can!” | Earthling Nature

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