Friday Fellow: ‘Orange Jaguar Snail’

by Piter Kehoma Boll

ResearchBlogging.orgLast week I introduced a land planarian that feeds on land snails, Obama ladislavii, or, as I called it, the Ladislau’s flatworm. Therefore, today, I thought it would be great to present a similar situation occurring backwards: a land snail that feeds on land planarians.

So let me introduce this little predator, the land snail Rectartemon depressus. Again, it is not a widely known species and thus it has no common names, but why not call it the ‘orange jaguar snail’? Species of the genus Euglandina, which are also predatory snails, are called ‘wolf snails’ by comparing them to a common predator in North America. As Rectartemon species are common in South America, we could perfectly call them ‘jaguar snails’, right?

Rectartemon depressus about to capture a land planarian Obama marmorata. Photo from Lemos et al., 2012

Rectartemon depressus about to capture a land planarian Obama marmorata. Photo extracted from Lemos et al., 2012

Found in areas of Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil, the orange jaguar snail has a yellow to orange body and a whitish shell. It is listed a vulnerable species in the Brazilian Red List, but it is not mentioned in the IUCN’s Red List.

Initially known as a predator of other land gastropods, the orange jaguar snail revealed a new item in its diet recently. During attempts to find the food items in the diet of some land planarians from southern Brazil, the orange jaguar snail was offered as a food option, but while the expectations were that the planarian would eat the snail, the opposite happened! After contacting the land planarian, the snail simply grasps it with its radula (the snail’s toothed tongue) and sucks it in very quickly, just as if it were eating a noodle!

The orange jaguar snail eagerly consumes several land planarians, both native and exotic species. It makes it one of the first known predators of land planarians. One of its prey is the Ladislau’s flatworm, so we have a snail that eats a flatworm that eats snails!

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References:

Lemos, V., Canello, R., & Leal-Zanchet, A. 2012. Carnivore mollusks as natural enemies of invasive land flatworms. Annals of Applied Biology, 161 (2), 127-131 DOI: 10.1111/j.1744-7348.2012.00556.x

Santos, S. B., Miyahira, I. C., Mansur, M. C. D. 2013. Freshwater and terrestrial molluscs in Brasil: current status of knowledge and conservation. Tentacle, 21, 40-42.

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Filed under Behavior, Conservation, Ecology, Friday Fellow

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