Friday Fellow: Green Tiger Beetle

by Piter Kehoma Boll

It is small, it is green, it is a fearsome predator… it is the green tiger beetle!

Look at this evil face. Photo by Wikimedia user Captainpixel*

Look at this evil face. Photo by Wikimedia user Captainpixel*

Cientitically known as Cicindela campestris, the green tiger beetle is a small and beautiful beetle found throughout Europe, being the most common tiger beetle in the continent. The adults can be seen from April to September and are 12–15 mm long, females being slightly larger than males. The dorsal color is green and the elythra have some small yellowish spots. The eyes and mandibles are large, revealing its predatory nature.

A pair of Cicindel campestris mating.

A pair of Cicindela campestris mating. Photo by Sander van der Molen.**

The green tiger beetle likes sunny places, usually open sites with little vegetation, and can run fast on the ground, chasing other small invertebrates, usually insects. The larvae are predatory as well and dig burrows from where they ambush other insects, especially ants.

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References:

EOL – Encyclopedia of Life. Green Tiger Beetle. Availabe at: < http://eol.org/pages/2869562/overview >. Access on June 16, 2016.

Wikipedia. Cicindela campestris. Availabe at: < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicindela_campestris >. Access on June 16, 2016.

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* Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

** Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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Filed under Entomology, Friday Fellow

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