Tag Archives: edible mushrooms

Friday Fellow: Common Stinkhorn

by Piter Kehoma Boll

Today things are getting sort of pornographic again. Some time ago I introduced a plant whose flowers resemble a woman’s vulva, the asian pigeonwing, and now is time to look at something of the other sex. And what could be better than the shameless penis? That’s the translation of the scientific name of this mushroom, Phallus impudicus, whose common name in English is much more discrete: common stinkhorn.

Phallus_impudicus2

Standing proud and shameless. Photo by flickr user Björn S…*

Found throughout Europe and parts of North America in deciduous woods, the common stinkhorn is easily recognizable for its phallic shape and even more for its foul smell that resembles carrion. This odor attracts insects, especially flies, that carry the spores away. This is a different method from the one used by most fungi, which simply release the spores in the air. Some people may mistake the common stinkhorn for morels (genus Morchella) but the two are completely unrelated, being from different phyla.

Despite the foul smell, the common stinkhorn is edible, especially in its first stages of development, when it resembles an egg. Due to its phallic shape, it is also seen as an aphrodisiac in some culture, as it is common with genitalia-shaped lifeforms.

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The immature fruiting body of Phallus impudicus is the most commonly eaten form. Photo by Danny Steven S.*

The common stinkhorn seems to have some anticoagulant properties and can be used for patients susceptible to thrombosis in the veins, such as patients treating breast cancer.

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ResearchBlogging.orgReferences:

Kuznecov, G., Jegina, K., Kuznecovs, S., & Kuznecovs, I. (2007). P151 Phallus impudicus in thromboprophylaxis in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy and hormonal treatment The Breast, 16 DOI: 10.1016/s0960-9776(07)70211-4

SMITH, K. (2009). On the Diptera associated with the Stinkhorn (Phallus impudicus Pers.) with notes on other insects and invertebrates found on this fungus. Proceedings of the Royal Entomological Society of London. Series A, General Entomology, 31 (4-6), 49-55 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-3032.1956.tb00206.x

Wikipedia. Phallus impudicus. Available at <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phallus_impudicus&gt;. Access on March 7, 2017.

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Friday Fellow: Scarlet Elf Cup

por Piter Kehoma Boll

If you like to pay attention on mushrooms growing on the forest soil, you may have found this little fellow sometimes, especially if you live in the Northern Hemisphere. Scientifically known as Sarcoscypha coccinea, its common names include ruby elfcup, scarlet elf cup, scarlet elf cap, or simply scarlet cup.

The scarlet elf cup is an ascomycete, so it is more closely related to morels and truffles than to more famous gilled umbrella-shaped mushrooms. Its cup-shaped fruiting body has a bright red color on the inside and a white color on the outside. It can be found growing on decayed wood in forests of North America and Europe, although it has also been recorded in Australia and Chile.

sarcoscypha_coccinea

Beautiful scarlet elf cups growing on a a fallen log. Photo by geograph user ceridwen*

The fruiting bodies of the scarlet elf cup may vary depending on the environmental conditions. Usually those growing on buried wood in places protected from wind are the greatest, while those growing on wood above the ground and being exposed to wind are usually smaller. There is no agreement on whether the fruiting bodies are edible or not. Some authors consider it edible, while other do not recomend its ingestion. However, there are some records of people eating it, and it is also used as a medicine by Native American peoples, such as the Oneida people.

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References:

EOL. Encyclopedia of Life. Sarcoscypha coccinea. Available at < http://eol.org/pages/1009245/overview >. Access on March 1, 2017.

Wikipedia. Sarcoscypha coccinea. Available at <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarcoscypha_coccinea >. Access on March 1, 2017.

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Friday Fellow: Witch’s Butter

ResearchBlogging.orgby Piter Kehoma Boll

Last week I introduced a cyanobacteria that reminds me of my childhood and that is commonly known as witch’s jelly or witch’s butter. But witch’s butter is also the common name of fungus, so I thought it would be interesting to introduce it today. Its scientific name is Tremella mesenterica.

tremella_mesenterica

Witch’s butter on dead wood. Photo by Jerzy Opiała.*

Also known as yellow brain, yellow trembler or golden jelly fungus, the witch’s butter is found in all continents and appears as a lobed and curly jelly material growing on dead wood and may be mistaken as a saprobic species, a wood decomposer, but that’s not true. The witch’s butter is actually a parasite of saprobic fungi of the genus Peniophora, such as the rosy crust Peniophora incarnata.

The witch’s butter is edible, but usually considered tasteless. Some preliminary results indicate that it may reduce blood glucose levels, therefore having the potential do be developed into a hypoglycemic agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

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References:

Lo, H., Tsai, F., Wasser, S., Yang, J., & Huang, B. (2006). Effects of ingested fruiting bodies, submerged culture biomass, and acidic polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan of Tremella mesenterica Retz.:Fr. on glycemic responses in normal and diabetic rats Life Sciences, 78 (17), 1957-1966 DOI: 10.1016/j.lfs.2005.08.033

Wikipedia. Tremella mesenterica. Available at <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tremella_mesenterica&gt;. Access on September 22, 2016.

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