Tag Archives: hearworms

Friday Fellow: Heartworm

by Piter Kehoma Boll

Life is not composed only by beautiful and cute creatures. Parasites form a big part of life. In fact, it is likely that there are more parasitic species than non-parasitic ones.

The heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) is one of these not-so-cute species. A species of roundworm, it infects small mammals, especially dogs, and is spread by mosquitoes.

The name heartworm comes from the fact that this worm lives in the heart and pulmonary arteries of dogs during its adult stage. The result of the infection may be heart failure and damage on the heart and the arteries, but some infections may pass completely unnoticed, especially in sedentary dogs.

Not a pleasant view. Heartworms in a dog's heart. Photo by Alan R Walker*.

Not a pleasant view. Heartworms in a dog’s heart. Photo by Alan R Walker*.

After males and females mate in the heart of the dog, females give birth to live larvae called microfilariae. These are released in the bloodstream and await for being transfered to a bloodsucking mosquito during a bite. Over 60 species of mosquitoes are known to serve as intermediate hosts of microfilariae.

Inside the mosquito, the microfilariae grow from the larval stage L1 to the larval stage L3 and then migrate to the mosquito’s salivary glands and, once it bites another dog, they are transferred to it and develop under the skin at the site of the bite to the stage L4. Now the L4 larve migrate to the dog’s muscles and develop into the stage L5. Finally, they start to migrate through the bloodstream until they reach the heart and the pulmonary artery, where they mold into adults and the cycle is complete.

We may find such worms disgusting, but we must admit that they have a complex and amazing life.

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References:

Wikimedia. Dirofilaria immitis. Available at: < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dirofilaria_immitis >. Access on June 7, 2012.

Ludlam, K. W.; Jachowski, L. A.; Otto, G. G. 1970. Potential vectors of Dirofilaria imiitis. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 157: 1354-1359.

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*Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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Filed under Friday Fellow, Parasites, worms