Tag Archives: invasive species

Going a long way with your mouth open to new tastes

by Piter Kehoma Boll

Everybody knows that human activities have driven our environment toward an unfortunate situation. The most popular forms of human impact include pollution, deforestation and overexploitation of natural resources, but certainly an important factor in remodeling ecosystems is the invasion of species.

While humans move around the world, they carry many species with them, either intentionally or not, an some of them establish successfully in the new environment, while others do not. But what makes some species become successful invaders while other are unable to do so?

It is clear for some time that having a broad niche, i.e., a broad tolerance in environmental conditions and a broad use of resources is very important to succeed in invading a new habitat. Food niche breadth, i.e., the amount of different food types one can ingest, is among the most important dimensions of the niche influencing the spread of a species.

I myself studied the food niche breadth of six Neotropical land planarians in my master’s thesis (see references below) and it was clear that the species with the broader niche are more likely to become invasive. Actually, the one with the broadest food niche, Obama nungara, is already an invader in Europe, as I already discussed here.

obama_marmorata_7

A specimen of Obama nungara from Southern Brazil that I used in my research. Photo by myself, Piter Kehoma Boll.*

But O. nungara has a broad food niche in its native range, which includes southern Brazil, and likely reflected this breadth in Europe. But could a species that has a narrow food niche in its native range broaden it in a new environment?

A recent study by Courant et al. (see references) investigated the diet of the African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, that is an invasive species in many parts of the world. They compared its diet in its native range in South Africa whith that in several populations in other countries (United States, Wales, Chile, Portugal and France).

Xenopus_laevis

The African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. Photo by Brian Gratwicke.**

The results indicated that X. laevis has a considerable broad niche in both its native and non-native ranges, but the diet in Portugal showed a greater shift compared to that in other areas, which indicates a great ability to adapt to new situations. In fact, the population from Portugal lives in running water, while in all other places this species prefers still water.

We can conclude that part of the success of the African clawed frog when invading new habitats is linked to its ability to try new tastes, broadening its food niche beyond that from its original populations. The situation in Portugal, including a different environment and a different diet, may also be the result of an increased selective pressure and perhaps the chances are that this population will change into a new species sooner than the others.

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References:
Boll PK & Leal-Zanchet AM (2016). Preference for different prey allows the coexistence of several land planarians in areas of the Atlantic Forest. Zoology 119: 162–168.

Courant J, Vogt S, Marques R, Measey J, Secondi J, Rebelo R, Villiers AD, Ihlow F, Busschere CD, Backeljau T, Rödder D, & Herrel A (2017). Are invasive populations characterized by a broader diet than native populations? PeerJ 5: e3250.

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Obama invades Europe: “Yes, we can!”

ResearchBlogging.orgby Piter Kehoma Boll

This information was known by me and some other people for quite a while, but only recently has caught attention of the general public. Obama is the newest threat in Europe.

No, I’m not talking about the president of the United States. I’m talking about a land flatworm whose name is  Obama nungara.

obama_marmorata_7

This is the magnificent Obama nungara. This specimen is from Brazil and looks particulary yellowish due to the strong light of the camera flash. Photo by Piter Kehoma Boll.*

It has been a while since a new invasive land flatworm started to appear in gardens of Europe, especially in Spain and France and eventually elsewhere, such as in the United Kingdom. It was quickly identified as being a Neotropical land planarian and posteriorly as belonging to the genus Obama, whose name has nothing to do with Barack Obama, but is rather a combination of the Tupi words oba (leaf) and ma (animal) as a reference to the worm’s shape.

obama_nungara

When you find Obama nungara in your garden, it will look much darker, like this one found in the UK. Photo by buglife.org.uk

At first it was thought that the planarian belonged to the species Obama marmorata, a species that is native from southern Brazil, but molecular and morphological analyses revealed it to be a new species. Actually, much of what was called Obama marmorata in Brazil was this new species. Thus, it was named nungara, which means “similar” in Tupi, due to its similarity with Obama marmorata.

obama_marmorata

This is Obama marmorata, the species that O. nungara was originally mistaken for. Photo by Fernando Carbayo.**

Measuring about 5 cm in length, sometimes a little more or a little less, O. nungara is currently known to feed on earthworms, snails, slugs and even other land planarians. Its impact on the European fauna is, however, still unknown, but the British charitable organization Buglife decided to spread an alert and many news websites seem to have loved the flatworm’s name and suddenly a flatworm is becoming famous.

Who said flatworms cannot be under the spotlight? Yes, they can!

See also: The Ladislau’s flatworm, a cousin of Obama nungara.

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References:

Álvarez-Presas, M., Mateos, E., Tudó, À., Jones, H., & Riutort, M. (2014). Diversity of introduced terrestrial flatworms in the Iberian Peninsula: a cautionary tale PeerJ, 2 DOI: 10.7717/peerj.430

Boll, P., & Leal-Zanchet, A. (2016). Preference for different prey allows the coexistence of several land planarians in areas of the Atlantic Forest Zoology, 119 (3), 162-168 DOI: 10.1016/j.zool.2016.04.002

Carbayo, F., Álvarez-Presas, M., Jones, H., & Riutort, M. (2016). The true identity of Obama (Platyhelminthes: Geoplanidae) flatworm spreading across Europe Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 177 (1), 5-28 DOI: 10.1111/zoj.12358

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Biological fight: Should we bring mammoths back?

by Piter Kehoma Boll

Everybody knows the amazing large animals that are found in Africa and Southeast Asia. Elephants, giraffes, rhinos, hippos, horses, lions, tigers… such large creatures, mostly mammals, are usually called megafauna, the “large fauna”.

Mammals as big as the African bush elephant once roamed the Americas. Photo by flickr user nickmandel2006*.

Mammals as big as the African bush elephant once roamed the Americas. Photo by flickr user nickmandel2006*.

The Americas once had an astonishing megafauna too, full of mastodons, mammoths, giant sloths, giant armadillos and sabertooth tigers. Nowadays it is restricted to some bears and jaguars. What happened to the rest of them? Well, most went extinct at the end of the Pleistocene, around 11,ooo years ago.

South America once had mammals as big as an African bush elephant. Picture by Dmitry Bogdanov** (dibgd.deviantart.com)

South America once had mammals as big as an African bush elephant, such as the giant sloth. Picture by Dmitry Bogdanov** (dibgd.deviantart.com)

As humans already inhabited the Americas by this time, it was always speculated if humans had something to do with their extinction. It is true that nowadays hundreds, thousands of species are endangered due to human activities, so it is easy to think that humans are the best explanation for their extinction, but 10 thousands years ago the number of humans on the planet was thousands of times smaller than today and our technology was still very primitive, so it is unlikely that we could hunt a species to extinction by that period… if we were working alone.

No, I’m not talking about humans cooperating with aliens! Our sidekick was the famous climate change. Periods of extreme warming during the pleistocene seem to have had a strong impact on the populations of many large mammals and, with the aid of humans hunting them down and spreading like an invasive species, the poor giants perished.

Le Mammouth by Paul Jamin

Le Mammouth by Paul Jamin

This happened more than 10 thousand years ago, TEN THOUSAND YEARS.

In Africa, elephants and large carnivores are well known for their importance in structuring communities, especially due to their trophic interactions that shape other populations. The extinct American megafauna most likely had the same impact on the ecosystem. As a result, suggestions to restore this extinct megafauna has been proposed, either by cloning some of the extinct species or, more plausibly, by introduced extant species with a similar ecological role.

Svenning et al. (2015) review the subject and argue in favor of the reintroduction of megafauna to restore ecological roles lost in the Pleistocene, an idea called “Pleistocene rewilding” or “trophic rewilding”, as they prefer. They present some maps showing the current distribution of large mammals and their historical distribution in the Pleistocene, which they call “natural”. They also propose some species to be introduced to substitute the ones extinct, including replacements for species extinct as long as 30 thousand years ago. Now is this a good idea? They think it is and one of the examples used is the reintroduction of wolves in the Yellowstone National Park. But wolves were not extinct for millenia there, neither are they a different species that would replace the role of an extinct one.

A wolf pack in Yellowstone National Park

A wolf pack in Yellowstone National Park

Rubenstein & Rubenstein (2016) criticized the idea, arguing that we should focus on protecting the remaining ecosystems and not trying to restore those that were corrupted thousands of years ago. They also argue that using similar species may have unintended consequences. Svenning et al. answered that this is mere opinion and that a systematic research program on trophic rewilding should be developed. The reintroduction of horses in the New World and its non-catastrophic consequences is another point used to respond to the critiques.

So what’s your opinion? Should we bring mammoths, mastodonts, giant sloths and sabertooth tigers back? Should we introduce elephants and lions in the Americas to play the role that mastodonts and smilodonts had?

My opinion is no. The idea may seem beautiful, but I think it is actually fantastic, too fabulous and sensational. Horses may have come back to the Americas without bringing destruction, but we cannot be sure with anything, even with several theoretical and small-scale studies. We all know how often introducing species goes wrong, very wrong. Look at poor Australia and Hawaii, for instance. Furthermore, those giant mammals went extinct TEN THOUSAND YEARS AGO. Certainly ecosystems have adapted to their extinction. Life always finds a way. There are worse threats to those ecosystems to be addressed, such as their eminent destruction to build more cities and raise more cattle and crops.

Get over it. Mammoths are gone. Let’s try to save the elephants instead, but without bringing them to the Brazilian cerrado. They don’t belong there. They belong in the African savannah.

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References:

Rubenstein, D. R.; Rubenstein, D. I. From Pleistocene to trophic rewilding: A wolf in sheep’s clothing. PNAS, 113(1): E1. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1521757113

Svenning, J-C.; Pedersen, P. B. M.; Donlan, C. J.; Ejrnæs, R.; Faurby, S.; Galetti, M.; Hansen, D. M.; Sandel, B.; Sandom, C. J.; Terborgh, J. W.; Vera, F. W. M. 2016. Science for a wilder Anthropocene: Synthesis and future directions for trophic rewilding research. PNAS, 113(4): 898-906. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.150255611

Svenning, J-C.; Pedersen, P. B. M.; Donlan, C. J.; Ejrnæs, R.; Faurby, S.; Galetti, M.; Hansen, D. M.; Sandel, B.; Sandom, C. J.; Terborgh, J. W.; Vera, F. W. M. 2016. Time to move on from ideological debates on rewilding. PNAS, 113(1): E2-E3. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1521891113

Wade, L. 2016. Giant jaguars, colossal bears done in by deadly combo of humans and heat. Science News. DOI: 10.1126/science.aag0623

Wade, L. 2016. Humans spread through South America like an invasive species. Science News. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf9881

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Friday Fellow: ‘Orange Jaguar Snail’

by Piter Kehoma Boll

ResearchBlogging.orgLast week I introduced a land planarian that feeds on land snails, Obama ladislavii, or, as I called it, the Ladislau’s flatworm. Therefore, today, I thought it would be great to present a similar situation occurring backwards: a land snail that feeds on land planarians.

So let me introduce this little predator, the land snail Rectartemon depressus. Again, it is not a widely known species and thus it has no common names, but why not call it the ‘orange jaguar snail’? Species of the genus Euglandina, which are also predatory snails, are called ‘wolf snails’ by comparing them to a common predator in North America. As Rectartemon species are common in South America, we could perfectly call them ‘jaguar snails’, right?

Rectartemon depressus about to capture a land planarian Obama marmorata. Photo from Lemos et al., 2012

Rectartemon depressus about to capture a land planarian Obama marmorata. Photo extracted from Lemos et al., 2012

Found in areas of Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil, the orange jaguar snail has a yellow to orange body and a whitish shell. It is listed a vulnerable species in the Brazilian Red List, but it is not mentioned in the IUCN’s Red List.

Initially known as a predator of other land gastropods, the orange jaguar snail revealed a new item in its diet recently. During attempts to find the food items in the diet of some land planarians from southern Brazil, the orange jaguar snail was offered as a food option, but while the expectations were that the planarian would eat the snail, the opposite happened! After contacting the land planarian, the snail simply grasps it with its radula (the snail’s toothed tongue) and sucks it in very quickly, just as if it were eating a noodle!

The orange jaguar snail eagerly consumes several land planarians, both native and exotic species. It makes it one of the first known predators of land planarians. One of its prey is the Ladislau’s flatworm, so we have a snail that eats a flatworm that eats snails!

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References:

Lemos, V., Canello, R., & Leal-Zanchet, A. 2012. Carnivore mollusks as natural enemies of invasive land flatworms. Annals of Applied Biology, 161 (2), 127-131 DOI: 10.1111/j.1744-7348.2012.00556.x

Santos, S. B., Miyahira, I. C., Mansur, M. C. D. 2013. Freshwater and terrestrial molluscs in Brasil: current status of knowledge and conservation. Tentacle, 21, 40-42.

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Friday Fellow: ‘Ladislau’s Flatworm’

ResearchBlogging.orgby Piter Kehoma Boll

Friday fellow is back!

After almost a year, I decided to go on with it. Actually, I interrupted it because of several other activities that were requiring my attention. Now let’s move on!

Today I will present to you another land planarian, and one I particularly like. Its binominal name is Obama ladislavii (formerly Geoplana ladislavii) and, as most land planarians, it does not have a popular name, although I suggest it to be ‘Ladislau’s Obama’ or ‘Ladislau’s Flatworm’. Now who is Ladislau?

Well, let’s first take a look at how this species was first described.

The Ladislau’s Flatworm was described in 1899 by the zoologist Ludwig von Graff in his famous monograph, “Monographie der Turbellarien”. Graff described it based on specimens sent to him from southern Brazil by the zoologist Hermann von Ihering, as well as on other specimens collected by the biologist Fritz Müller.

By the time Ihering and Müller were collecting specimens in Brazil, a botanist named Ladislau de Souza Mello Netto was the director of the Brazilian National Museum in Rio de Janeiro. He actually hired them as traveling naturalists, so we can say that he was the responsible for them being able to collect specimens in Brazil.

As a result, when describing this new planarian species, Graff decided to call it ladislavii in honor of Ladislau Netto. At least I think so! I did not find any reference to that, as Graff did not explain the etymology of the name in the description. However, whom else would ladislavii be referring to?

Now that we explained the name, it is time to talk about the worm itself.

Ladislau’s flatworm is found in southern Brazil’s states of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina and is easily recognized by its green color. The larger specimens can measure more than 10 cm in length and more than 1 cm in breadth while creeping, so it is a considerably large planarian for the local standards.

Obama ladislavii in all of its greenness. Photo by Piter K. Boll*

Obama ladislavii in all of its greenness. Photo by Piter K. Boll*

Most land planarians are found either in very well preserved ecosystems, for example, inside undisturbed forests, or in very well disturbed ecosystems, such as gardens and urban parks. Now we can find the Ladislau’s flatworm living very well both in a natural paradise in the middle of a dense forest as well as in that small garden beside a very busy street. How is that possible?

The life history of many land planarian species is completely unknown, so that we do not even know what they eat. They are recognized as important predators of other invertebrates, but that is not enough, as being a predator does not mean that you eat anything that moves, right?

Until recently, we knew very little about the Ladislau’s flatworm, but I started to study it along with other species in the last years and so now we at least have an idea of what it eats, and the answer is: Gastropods, i.e., slugs and snails!

We usually found gastropods in gardens, parks, plantations and everywhere humans plant something, so they are an available meal for the Ladislau’s flatworm. It feeds on many of those annoying little pests you may find in your garden, including the garden snail (Helix aspersa), the Asian trampsnail (Bradybaena similaris), and the marsh slug (Deroceras laeve).

Obama ladislavii and one of its snacks, the snail Bradybaena similaris

Obama ladislavii and one of its snacks, the snail Bradybaena similaris. Photo by Piter K. Boll*

The Ladislau’s flatworm can follow the slime trail left by the gastropod in order to find and capture it. The most efficient way for the planarian to subjugate the prey is by surrounding it with its body and using muscular power, not very different from what a constrictor snake does.

Considering its taste for those pests, the Ladislau’s flatworm seems to be a good item to have in your garden, right? Yes, but only if you live in southern Brazil. Exporting it to other areas can lead to catastrophic results, as the case you can read here.

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References:

Boll, P., & Leal-Zanchet, A. (2014). Predation on invasive land gastropods by a Neotropical land planarian Journal of Natural History, 1-12 DOI: 10.1080/00222933.2014.981312

Graff, L. v. 1899. Monographie der Turbellarien. II. Tricladida Terricola. Engelmann, Leipzig, 574 p.

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The New Guinea flatworm visits France – a menace

by Piter Kehoma Boll

ResearchBlogging.orgFor as long as life exists, it spreads. Organisms move (even if only as gametes or spores) and conquer new environments if they fit. If it wasn’t so, life wouldn’t be found all over the world. Recently, however, due to human dispersion, species are much more likely to reach places far away from where they were born. We considered a species living outside its native area as exotic. And there are a lot of them. I wonder if there is any place where no exotic species exist.

In my first post in this blog, I talked about how exotic species are not always a threat to native ecosystems. But many of them are, indeed, dangerous to local diversity. The ISSG (Invasive Species Specialist Group) lists what are considered the 100 worst invasive species. Strangely, they fail to mention the top worst invasive species, Homo sapiens.

Among those 100 species, a very famous one is the giant African land snail, Achatina fulica. Native to East Africa, it has been introduced worldwide and is a major pest in gardens and agricultural sites, and can also be an intermediate host of several parasites that infect humans.

The giant African land snail Achatina fulica. Photo by Eric Guinther. Extracted from commons.wikimedia.org

The giant African land snail Achatina fulica. Photo by Eric Guinther*. Extracted from commons.wikimedia.org

As an attempt to control the populations of Achatina fulica, some “genius” decided to introduce one more exotic species in the areas where A. fulica was a pest: a voracious generalist predator of land snails.

Let's fight against an exotic pest with another exotic pest!

Let’s fight against an exotic pest with another exotic pest!

As a result, the predator snail Euglandina rosea, known as the rosy wolfsnail or cannibal snail, was introduced in areas infested by A. fulica. But E. rosea is native to North America while A. fulica is native to East Africa. In order to be effective, E. rosea had to be a generalist predator, feeding on any kind of snails. And that’s what it does…

The rosy wolfsnail Euglandina rosea. Photo by Tim Ross. Extracted from commons.wikimedia.org

The rosy wolfsnail Euglandina rosea. Photo by Tim Ross. Extracted from commons.wikimedia.org

Euglandina rosea started to prey on A. fulica, but… ops! It also attacked native land snails and led several species to extinction in Pacific Islands. It became a pest even worse than the giant African land snail…

Not satisfied by the damage caused by this predator, people decided to introduce one more species in order to control A. fulica. And the chosen one was another voracious generalist predator of land snails, the New Guinea flatworm Platydemus manokwari. As its name suggest, thee New Guinea flatworm is native to New Guinea, again a different place, and so, in order to feed on the giant African land snail, it had to feed on any kind of land snail. Thus, it became a pest as harmful as the previous one and led several species of land snails to extinction in Pacific Islands.

Until very recently it was thought that the New Guinea flatworm infestation was restricted to the Indo-Pacific Region, not so far from home. However, a recent paper by Justine et al. (2014) reports its presence in a hothouse in Caen, northern France. This report extends significantly its occurrence over the world and indicates that it may be much more spread than previously thought. Unfortunately, people are more interesting in preserving their gardens than preserving biodiversity. So those predatory pests will probably keep being introduced as biological controls, even though they pose a threat to ecosystems.

The New Guinea Flatworm Platydemus manokwari. Photo by Pierre Gros, taken from Justine et al., 2014, via commons.wikimedia.org.

Bonjour tout le monde! I came to visit Paris! The New Guinea Flatworm Platydemus manokwari. Photo by Pierre Gros**, taken from Justine et al., 2014, via commons.wikimedia.org.

Fortunately, in France, P. manokwati seems to be restricted to greenhouses. Let’s hope that it won’t be found somewhere else.

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References:

Albuquerque, F., Peso-Aguiar, M., & Assunção-Albuquerque, M. 2008. Distribution, feeding behavior and control strategies of the exotic land snail Achatina fulica (Gastropoda: Pulmonata) in the northeast of Brazil. Brazilian Journal of Biology, 68 (4), 837-842 DOI: 10.1590/S1519-69842008000400020

ISSG, Invasive Species Specialist Group. 100 of the World’s Worst Invasive Alien Species. Availabe at: < http://www.issg.org/database/species/search.asp?st=100ss >. Access on April 04, 2014.

Justine, J., Winsor, L., Gey, D., Gros, P., & Thévenot, J. 2014. The invasive New Guinea flatworm in France, the first record for Europe: time for action is now. PeerJ, 2 DOI: 10.7717/peerj.297

Sugiura, S., Okochi, I., & Tamada, H. 2006. High Predation Pressure by an Introduced Flatworm on Land Snails on the Oceanic Ogasawara Islands. Biotropica, 38 (5), 700-703 DOI: 10.1111/j.1744-7429.2006.00196.x

Sugiura, S., & Yamaura, Y. 2008. Potential impacts of the invasive flatworm Platydemus manokwari on arboreal snails. Biological Invasions, 11 (3), 737-742 DOI: 10.1007/s10530-008-9287-1

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Friday Fellow: Touch-me-not

by Piter Kehoma Boll

ResearchBlogging.org It’s been a long time since I updated the blog, as you might have noticed, but time is really something I don’t have much lately. I just came back from Argentina yesterday after taking part in COMPORTA 2013, the first Argentinian Congress of Behavioural Biology. Among the several works presented, there was one, by researcher Dr. Monica Gagliano from the University of Western Australia, about memory and learning… in plants!

Well, I’m not here to talk about this subject, but I intend to do a post about this as soon as possible. I want to introduce here the species used by Dr. Gagliano in her study: the touch-me-not Mimosa pudica.

Mimosa pudica with flowers. Photo by Eric Hunt. Extracted from Wikimedia Commons.

Mimosa pudica with flowers. Photo by Eric Hunt. Extracted from Wikimedia Commons.

Neotropical in origin, i.e., native from Central and South America, the touch-me-not is widely known by its capacity to fold its leaves inwards when touched, as a possible mechanism to avoid predation. It’s interesting because most plants (except insectivores) doesn’t show such a quick movement.

In many places, the touch-me-not is cultivated for this charming way to move, and it has also become naturalized all around the world, being considered an invasive species mainly in Southeast and South Asia, Pacific Islands, Tanzania and Australia.

This rapid folding of leaves happens through an action potential running through the plant leaf and reaching a structure at its base, called pulvinus, which makes some cells lose water and thus folding the leaf. Action potentials are basically an electrical current passing through the membrane of a cell. They are far more common in animals, being essential for neurons and muscle cells, but are rare in plants, though existent in some, like the touch-me-not. What if some complex structure like this one could lead, someday, to the evolution of more complex behaviors in plants? Wouldn’t that be cool?

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References:

ROBLIN, G. (1979). Mimosa pudica: A Model for the Study of the Excitability in Plants. Biological Reviews, 54 (2), 135-153 DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-185X.1979.tb00870.x

Wikipedia: Mimosa pudica. Available online at: <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mimosa_pudica>. Access on April 19, 2013.

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