Tag Archives: model organisms

Friday Fellow: Baker’s Yeast

by Piter Kehoma Boll

Living along humans for centuries, today’s Friday Fellow is certainly one of the most beloved fungi. Scientifically known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, its common names in English include baker’s yeast, brewer’s yeast or ale’s yeast.

800px-saccharomyces_cerevisiae_sem

Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the scanning electron microscope. Photo by Mogana Das Murtey and Patchamuthu Ramasamy.*

Under the microscope, the cells of this single-celled species are ellipsoid or sphere-shaped and usually show small buds from new cells growing from the larger one. But you may have seen this species being sold as tablets or grains in the supermarket, as they are used to make bread and many alcoholic bevarages, such as wine and beer, but the baker’s yeast is much more interesting than just that.

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Grains of dried but yet alive baker’s yeast as it is sold commercially.

The cells of the baker’s yeast occur naturally on ripe fruits, such as grapes, and this was likely the original source of the strains currently cultivated by humans. The yeast reaches the fruits through many wasp species that have it growing in their intestines, an ideal environment for the fungus’ sexual reproduction.

As it is easily cultivated in the lab and has a short generation time, the baker’s yeast has become one of the most important model organisms in current biological studies. It was, in fact, the first eukaryotic organism to have its whole genome sequenced more than 20 years ago.

Saccharomyces_cerevisiae

Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on solid agar in the lab. Photo by Conor Lawless.**

More than giving us food and drink, this amazing yeast has increased our understanding of gene expression, DNA repair and aging, among many other things. Live long the yeast!

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References:

Giaever, G.; Chu, A. M.; Ni, L.; Connelly, C. et al. (2002) Functional profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. Nature 418 (6896): 387-391.

Herskowitz, I. (1988) Life cycle of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Microbiological Reviews 52 (4): 536-553.

Wikipedia. Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Available at < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saccharomyces_cerevisiae >. Access on July 25, 2017.

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Friday Fellow: Giant Amoeba

by Piter Kehoma Boll

The adjective “giant” can be quite relative. When regarding microorganisms, even something with a few milimeters can be considered a giant, and that is the case with the giant amoeba Chaos carolinense (sometimes wrongly written as Chaos carolinensis).

Chaos_carolinense

A chaotic mess as any good amoeba. Photo by Tsukii Yuuji.

Measuring up to 5 mm in length, the giant amoeba is a freshwater organism and is easily seen with the naked eye and, since it is also easily cultivated in the laboratory, it became widely used in laboratory studies.

As with amoebas in general, the giant amoeba has an irregular cell with several pseudopods that can contract and expand. The cell has hundreds of nuclei, as it is common with species of the genus Chaos, this being the main difference between them and the closely related genus Amoeba.

The diet of the giant amoeba is variable and includes bacteria, algae, protozoan and even some small animals. In the lab, they are usually fed with ciliates of the genus Paramecium.

Chaos (Pelomyxa) carolinensisChaos with paramecium prey

A specimen of Chaos carolinense feeding on several individuals of Paramecium. Photo by Carolina Biological Supply Company.*

Wouldn’t the giant amoeba make a nice unicelular pet?

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References:

Tan, O. L. L.; Almsherqi, Z. A. M.; Deng, Y. (2005) A simple mass culture of the amoeba Chaos carolinense: revisit. Protistology, 4(2): 185–190.

Wikipedia. Chaos (genus). Available at: <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaos_(genus)&gt;. Access on June 20, 2017.

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Friday Fellow: Field Hornwort

by Piter Kehoma Boll

Three weeks ago our Friday Fellow was a moss, being the third non-vascular plant to be introduced. And before going back to vascular plants, let’s take a look at another non-vascular fellow from the only non-vascular division that was not yet introduced here, the hornworts.

The species I chose to start the participation of hornworts is the field hornwort, Anthoceros agrestis.

Anthoceros_agrestis

A piece of soil with the field hornwort growing on the top. Photo by Wikimedia user BerndH.*

As with other hornworts, the field hornwort has a dominant gametophyte phase which appears as a small flattened plant growing very close to the soil. The sporophyte grows over it and has the form of an elongate vertical horn, hence the name hornwort.

Found in Europe and North America, the field hornwort usually grows in wet places and is often surrounded by  mosses. Its gametophyte has some internal cavities filled with muscilage that are a favorite place for species of cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc to grow. This association is what makes hornworts acquire their slight bluish tinge.

The field hornwort has the smallest genome of all non-vascular plants studied until the present and because of that it has been cultivated to serve as an interesting model organism.

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ResearchBlogging.orgReferences:

EOL – Encyclopedia of life. Field Hornwort. Available at <http://eol.org/pages/399515/overview&gt;. Access on May 18, 2017.

Szövényi, P., Frangedakis, E., Ricca, M., Quandt, D., Wicke, S., & Langdale, J. (2015). Establishment of Anthoceros agrestis as a model species for studying the biology of hornworts BMC Plant Biology, 15 (1) DOI: 10.1186/s12870-015-0481-x

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Friday Fellow: Spreading Earthmoss

by Piter Kehoma Boll

If you still think mosses are uninteresting lifeforms, perhaps you will change your mind after knowing the spreading earthmoss, Physcomitrella patens.

Found in temperate regions of the world, except for South America, but more commonly recorded in North America and Eurasia, the spreading earthmoss grows near water bodies, being one of the first species to colonize the exposed soil around pools of water. Although widely distributed, it is not a common species.

Physcomitrella_patens

The spreading earthmoss growing on mud. Photo by Hermann Schachner.

Since the beginning of the 1970s, the spreading earthmoss has been used as a model organism, especially regarding gene manipulation. Differently from what occurs in vascular plants, the dominant life phase in mosses is the gametophyte, an haploid organism, meaning it has only one copy of each chromosome in its cells. This is an ideal condition for the study of gene expression, as the activation or inactivation of a gene is not hindered by a second one in another copy of the chromosome in the same cell.

Physcomitrella_patens_ecotypes

Physcomitrella patens growing in the lab. Credits to the Lab of Ralf Reski.*

By controlling gene expression in the spreading earthmoss, researches can track the role of each one of them in the plant’s development. Comparing these data with that known from flowering plants, we can have a better understanding of how the plant kingdom evolved.

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ResearchBlogging.orgReferences:

Cove, D. (2005). The Moss Physcomitrella patens Annual Review of Genetics, 39 (1), 339-358 DOI: 10.1146/annurev.genet.39.073003.110214

Schaefer, D. (2001). The Moss Physcomitrella patens, Now and Then PLANT PHYSIOLOGY, 127 (4), 1430-1438 DOI: 10.1104/pp.127.4.1430

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Friday Fellow: Sun Beetle

ResearchBlogging.orgby Piter Kehoma Boll

Who says beetles cannot be cute? Take a look at those guys:

pachnoda_marginata

They are eating a piece of banana. Photo by Wikimedia user Evanherk.*

These little fellows are beetles of the species Pachnoda marginata, commonly known as sun beetle or taxi cab beetle. Native from Africa, they reach up to 30 mm as adults and 60 mm as larvae and are one of the most common beetles raised as pets.

pachnoda_marginata_peregrina

An adult with the wings exposed, about to fly. Photo by Wikimedia user Drägüs.*

The sun beetle has nine subspecies, each with a particular color pattern. The most well known subspecies is Pachnoda marginata peregrina and is the one shown in the photos above.

Since the sun beetle is easy to keep in the lab, it has been eventually used in scientific studies, especially some related to the neurology of the olphactory receptors.

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References:

Larsson, M. C., Stensmyr, M.. C., Bice, S. B., & Hansson, B. S. (2003). Attractiveness of Fruit and Flower Odorants Detected by Olfactory Receptor Neurons in the Fruit Chafer Pachnoda marginata Journal of Chemical Ecology, 29 (5), 1253-1268 DOI: 10.1023/A:1023893926038

Stensmyr, Marcus C., Larsson, Mattias C., Bice, Shannon, & Hansson, Bill S. (2001). Detection of fruit- and flower-emitted volatiles by olfactory receptor neurons in the polyphagous fruit chafer Pachnoda marginata (Coleoptera: Cetoniinae) Journal of Comparative Physiology A, 187 (7), 509-519

Wikipedia. Pachnoda marginata. Availabe at: < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pachnoda_marginata >. Access on September 8, 2016.

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