Tag Archives: Mollusca

Friday Fellow: Greater Blue-Ringed Octopus

by Piter Kehoma Boll

Tropical waters are always thriving with diversity, therefore it is hard to keep away from them. Today’s Friday Fellow is one more creature from the tropical oceanic waters, more precisely from the Indo-Pacific waters. Being found from Sri Lanka to the Phillipines, Japan and Australia, our fellow is called Hapalochlaena lunulata and popularly known as the greater blue-ringed octopus.

This adorable octopus is very small, measuring only about 10 cm, arms included. It is, however, easy to caught attention because its whitish to dark-yellow body is covered by about 60 rings that show a beautiful electric-blue color with a black outline. As with most octopuses, the color may change according to the animal’s needs in order to make him more or less visible.

A specimen of the greater blue-ringed octopus in Indonesia. Photo by Jens Petersen.*

This adorable color pattern, which may look attractive to us, humans, is nevertheless a warning sign. The grater blue-ringed octopus is a venomous creature and may even kill a human being if threatened. As other octopuses, it is a predator and feeds mainly on crustaceans and bivalves and immobilizes them with a toxin before consumption. This is a mild toxin, though. The real danger is on its defensive behavior.

When threatened, the greater blue-ringed octopus usually begins a warning display by flashing its rings in strong colors. If this is not enough to make the threatening creature retreat, it will atack and bite its harasser. The bite is usually painless but deadly. The venom injected is nothing more nothing less than the infamous tetrodoxin, the same thing that makes a pufferfish a dangerous meal. As you may know, tetrodoxin is a potent neurotoxin that kills within a few minutes to a few hours by blocking the action potential in cells, leading to paralysis and death by asphyxia. In the greater blue-ringed octopus, tetrodotoxin is produced by bacteria that live inside their salivary glands.

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A greater blue-ringed octopus swimming. Photo by Elias Levy.**

A study analyzing the sexual behavior of the greater blue-ringed octopus showed that mating occurs during encounters of both male-female and male-male pairs. The mating ritual of octopuses consists of the male introducing the hectocotylus, a modified arm specialized in delivering sperm, into the female mantle. In male-male pairings, one of the males always put its hectocotylus into the other male’s mantle and there was no attempt from the receptive male to avoid the act. The only difference between males mating with females or with other males was that they only delivered sperm to females and never to males. What can we conclude? Have octopuses found an efficient way to be bisexual creatures by having fun with other males while still able to keep their sperm to give it to females?

The diversity of life always fascinates us!

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References:

Cheng, M. W.; Caldwell, R. L. (2000) Sex identification and mating in the blue-ringed octopus, Hapalochlaena lunulataAnimal Behavior 60: 27-33. DOI: 10.1006/anbe.2000.1447

Mäthger, L. M.; Bell, G. R. R.; Kuzirian, A. M.; Allen, J. J.; Hanlon, R. T. (2012) How does the blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena lunulata) flash its blue rings? Journal of Experimental Biology 215: 3752-3757. DOI: 10.1242/jeb.076869

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*Creative Commons License
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**Creative Commons License
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Friday Fellow: Sea Swallow

by Piter Kehoma Boll

As the second species of today, I’m bringing a terrible but beautiful predator of the Portuguese man o’ war, the sea swallow Glaucus atlanticus, which is, in my opinion, one of the most beautiful sea creatures.

Glaucus_atlanticus

Isn’t it a magnificent creature? Photo by Sylke Rohrlach.*

Also known as blue dragon, blue glaucus and many other names, the sea swallow is a small sea slug that measures up to 3 cm in length as an adult. This species is pelagic, meaning that it lives in the open ocean, neither close to the bottom nor close to the shore.  Although it is found in all three oceans, genetic evidences indicate that the populations from the Atlantic, the Pacific and the Indian oceans have diverged more than 1 million years ago.

The sea swallow has a gas-filled sac in the stomach that makes it float upside down in the water, meaning that its ventral side is directed upward. The wide blue-bordered band running along the body, as seen in the picture above, is the slug’s foot. It’s dorsal side, which is directed downward, is completely white or light gray.

Being a carnivorous species, the sea swallows feeds on several cnidarian species, especially the Portuguese man o’ war. It usually collects the cnidocytes (the sting cells) of its prey and put them on its own body, so that it becomes as stingy as or even stingier than its prey. If you find one lying on the beach, be careful.

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References:

Churchull, C. K. C.; Valdés, Á.; Foighil, D. Ó (2014) Afro-Eurasia and the Americas present barriers to gene flow for the cosmopolitan neustonic nudibranch Glaucus atlanticus. Marine Biology, 161(4): 899-910.

Wikipedia. Glaucus atlanticus. Available at < https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glaucus_atlanticus >. Access on June 18, 2017.

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Friday Fellow: Hummingbird Bobtail Squid

by Piter Kehoma Boll

If you are digging through the sand at the bottom of the clear tropical waters around Indonesia and the Philippines, you may end up finding a colorful little creature, the hummingbird bobtail squid, Euprymna berryi, also known as Berry’s bobtail squid.

Euprymna_berryi

A beautiful specimen photographed in East Timor. Photo by Nick Hobgood.*

Measuring about 3 cm if male or 5 cm if female, the humminbird bobtail squid is actually more closely related to cuttlefish than to true squids. Its body has a translucent skin marked by many black chromatophores, and to the human eye the animal seems to have a color pattern formed by a blend of black, electric blue and green or purple dots.

During the day, the hummingbid bobtail squid remains most of the time buried in the sand, coming out at night to capture small crustaceans, which it hunts using a bioluminescent organ in its gill cavity.

In some areas around its distribution, the hummingbid bobtail squid is captured and sold in small fisheries, but as the data on the distribution and population dynamics of this species are very poorly known, there is no way to say whether it is vulnerable or endangered in any way. As a result, it is listed as Data Deficient in the IUCN Red List.

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ResearchBlogging.orgReferences:

Barratt, I., & Allcock, L. (2012). Euprymna berryi The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species DOI: 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2012-1.RLTS.T162599A925343.en

Wikipedia. Euprymna berryi. Available at <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euprymna_berryi&gt;. Access on March 8, 2017.

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