Tag Archives: Rhizaria

Friday Fellow: Crawling Spider Alga

by Piter Kehoma Boll

The world of unicelular creatures includes fascinating species, some of which were already presented here. And today one more is coming, the marine phytoplanctonic amoeboid protist Chlorarachnion reptans, which again is a species without a common name, so I created one: crawling spider alga.

chlorarachnion_reptans

A plasmodium of the crawling spider alga Chlorarachnion reptans. Photo by Wikimedia user NEON.*

The crawling spider alga was dicovered in the Canary Islands in 1930. It is an amoeboid alga that forms plasmodia (multinucleated networks) of cells connected by thin strips of cytoplasm (reticulopodia). The reticulopodia are also used to capture prey (bacteria and smaller protists, especially algae) working kind of like a spider web. Additionally, the crawling spider alga has chloroplasts, so being able to conduct photosynthesis. It is, therefore, a mixotrophic organism, having more than one way of feeding.

The chloroplasts of the crawling spider alga, as well of other species in its group, called Chlorarachniophyceae, have four membrane layers and appears to have evolved from a green alga that was ingested and became an endosymbiont. As a result, the chloroplast of the crawling spider alga has two sets of DNA, one from the original chloroplast that came from an endosymbiotic cyanobacteria (located inside the inner membrane) and one of the green algae (between the two inner and the two outer membranes).

Although traditionally seen as a group of algae, the chlorarachniophytes are not closely related to the more “typical” algae, such as red, green, brown and golden algae or diatoms. They are actually relatives of other protists with thin net- or thread- like pseudopods, such as radiolarians and foraminifers, forming with them the group Rhizaria.

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ResearchBlogging.orgReferences:

AlgaeBase. Chlorarachnion reptans Geitler. Available at <http://www.algaebase.org/search/species/detail/?species_id=59340&gt;. Access on March 5, 2017.

EOL – Encyclopedia of Life. Chlorarachnion reptans. Available at <http://eol.org/pages/897235/overview&gt;. Access on March 5, 2017.

Hibberd, D., & Norris, R. (1984). Cytology and ultrastructure of Chlorarachnion reptans (Chlorarachniophyta divisio nova, Chlorarachniophyceae classis nova) Journal of Phycology, 20 (2), 310-330 DOI: 10.1111/j.0022-3646.1984.00310.x

Ludwig, M., & Gibbs, S. (1989). Evidence that the nucleomorphs of Chlorarachnion reptans (Chloraracnhiophyceae) are vestigial nuclei: morphology, division and DNA-DAPI fluorescence Journal of Phycology, 25 (2), 385-394 DOI: 10.1111/j.1529-8817.1989.tb00135.x

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Friday Fellow: Northern Plaited Radiolarian

by Piter Kehoma Boll

Some weeks ago I introduced a diatom here and mentioned that, despite the fact that they are a very abundant group, little information on species is available. Today our species is a radiolarian and, just as with the diatoms, they are abundant but little known.

I struggled to find an extant species that also had a good and available photo to share. And the winner was a species known as Cleveiplegma boreale, or Rhizoplegma boreale perhaps. I’m not sure what is the currently accepted name. Anyway, it does not have a common name, but I decided to create one, so let’s call it “northern plaited radiolarian”.

Radiolarians are unicelular organism that have an intricate mineral skeleton that contains a central capsule that typically divides the cell into two portions: an inner one and an outer one. Our fellow today looks like this:

cleveiplegma_boreale

A living specimen of the northern plaited radiolarian. Photo by John Dolan.*

The northern plaited radiolarian has from 6 to 10 spines growing out of it and there is a complex plaited pattern of the skeleton that surrounds them and the inner shell. Measuring anout 20µm in diameter, it is a rather large radiolarian.

Although it is known from fossils along the Quaternary, from at least 10 thousand years before present, the northern plaited radiolarian is still a living species. Currently it is known to occur in the Nordic Seas, around Scandinavia, Iceland and Greenland, in the North Pacific, including the Bering Sea, and in the Southern Ocean, around Antarctica. We can see, therefore, that this species likes cold waters.

Ah, and they feed on diatoms… I guess.

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ResearchBlogging.orgReferences:

Dolven, J., & Bjørklund, K. (2001). An early Holocene peak occurrence and recent distribution of Rhizoplegma boreale (Radiolaria): a biomarker in the Norwegian Sea Marine Micropaleontology, 42 (1-2), 25-44 DOI: 10.1016/S0377-8398(01)00011-1

Dumitrica, P. (2013). Cleveiplegma nov. gen., a new generic name for the radiolarian species Rhizoplegma boreale (Cleve, 1899) Revue de Micropaléontologie, 56 (1), 21-25 DOI: 10.1016/j.revmic.2013.01.001

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Friday Fellow: Tepid ammonia

by Piter Kehoma Boll

One of the few groups of living being not yet featured in Friday Fellow is Rhizaria, a group of single-celled organisms that includes the famous foraminifers. So today I decided to bring you just that, a foraminifer. And I think a good species to start with is Ammonia tepida, or the “tepid ammonia” as I decided to call it.

A live Ammonia tepida. Credits to Scott Fay.*

A live Ammonia tepida. Credits to Scott Fay.*

The tepid ammonia is found worldwide in brackish waters, or more precisely in the sediments deposited in brackish waters worlwide. It is able to tolerate a wide range of temperatures and degrees of salinity and is considered an ideal species of laboratory studies. As most foraminifers, the tepid ammonia secrets a shell of calcium carbonate, which is deposited on the cell’s surface in the form of a chain of chambers forming a spiral path, thus making it look like a snail shell.

Living in the sediments, the tepid ammonia feeds mainly on algae, but also consumes bacteria. In the laboratory, it demonstrated to have the ability to prey on small animals, such as nematodes, copepods and molluk larvae.

This kid got talent!

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References:

Dupuy, C.; Rossignol, L.; Geslin, E.; Pascal, P.-Y. (2010) Predation of mudflat meio-macrofaunal metazoans by a calcareous foraminifer, Ammonia tepida (Cushman, 1926). The Journal of Foraminiferal Research 40 (4): 305–312.

Munsel, D.; Kramar, U.; Dissard, D.; Nehrke, G.; Berner, Z.; Bijma, J.; Reichart, G.-J.; Neumann, T. (2010) Heavy metal incorporation in foraminiferal calcite: results from multi-element enrichment culture experiments with Ammonia tepida. Biogeosciences 7 (8): 2339–2350.

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