Tag Archives: snails

Land snails on islands: fascinating diversity, worrying vulnerability

by Piter Kehoma Boll

The class Gastropoda, which includes snails and slugs, is only beaten by the insects in number of species worldwide, having currently about 80 thousand described species. Among those, about 24 thousand live on land, where they are a very successful group, especially on oceanic islands.

The Hawaiian Islands alone, for example, have more than 750 snail species and there are more than 100 endemic species in the small island of Rapa in the South Pacific. This diversity is much higher than that in any continental place, but the reason for that is not completely understood.

Mandarina

A land snail of the genus Mandarina, endemic to the Ogasawara Islands, Japan. Photo by flickr user kmkmks (Kumiko).*

One of the most likely explanations for this huge diversity on islands is related to the lack of predators. The most common predators of snails include birds, mammals, snakes, beetles, flatworms and other snails. Most of those are not present in small and isolated islands, which allows an increase in land snail populations in such places. Without too much dangers to worry about, the community of land snails n islands can explore a greater range of niches, eventually leading to speciation.

Unfortunately, as always, the lack of danger leads to recklessness. Without predators to worry about, insular land snails tend to lay fewer eggs than their mainland relatives. If there is no danger of having most of your children eaten, why would you have that many? It is better to lay larger eggs, putting more resources on fewer babies, and so assure that they will be strong enough to fight against other snail species. Afterall, the large number of species in such a small place as an island likely leads to an increased amount of competition between species.

But why is this recklessness? Well, because you never known when a predator will arrive. And they already arrived… due to our fault.

The diversity of insular land nails was certainly affected by habitat loss promoted by humans, but also by predators that we carried with us to the islands, whether intentionally or not. These predators include rats, the predatory snail Euglandina rosea and the land flatworm Platydemus manokwari, the latter being most likely the worst of all.

800px-platydemus_manokwari

The flatworm Platydemus manokwari in the Ogasawara Islands. Photo by Shinji Sugiura.

This flatworm arrived at the Chichijima Island, part of the Ogasawara Islands in the Pacific Ocean, in the early 1990s and in about two decades it led most land snail species on the island to extinction and many more are about to face the same fate on this island and on others. Not being prepared for predators, these poor snails cannot reproduce fast enough to replace all individuals eaten by the flatworm.

We have to act quickly if we want to save those that are still left.

See also: The New Guinea flatworm visits France – a menace.

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ResearchBlogging.orgReferences and further reading:

Chiba, S., & Cowie, R. (2016). Evolution and Extinction of Land Snails on Oceanic Islands. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, 47 (1), 123-141 DOI: 10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-112414-054331

Sugiura, S., Okochi, I., & Tamada, H. (2006). High Predation Pressure by an Introduced Flatworm on Land Snails on the Oceanic Ogasawara Islands. Biotropica, 38 (5), 700-703 DOI: 10.1111/j.1744-7429.2006.00196.x

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*Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic License.

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Filed under Conservation, Extinction, mollusks, Zoology

New Species: July 11 to July 20

by Piter Kehoma Boll

Here is a list of species described from July 11 to July 20. It certainly does not include all described species. Most information comes from the journals Mycokeys, Phytokeys, Zookeys, Phytotaxa, Zootaxa, International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology, and Systematic and Applied Microbiology, as well as journals restricted to certain taxa.

Pseudoechthistatus sinicus(top) and P. pufujiae are two of the more than 40 new species of beetles described in the last 10 days.

Pseudoechthistatus sinicus (top) and P. pufujiae (bottom) are two of the 40 new species of beetles described in the last 10 days.

Archaea

Bacteria

SARs

Plants

Excavates

Fungi

Sponges

Flatworms

Annelids

Mollusks

Roundworms

Arachnids

Myriapods

Crustaceans

Hexapods

Cartilaginous fishes

Ray-finned fishes

Reptiles

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Filed under Systematics, taxonomy

Friday Fellow: ‘Orange Jaguar Snail’

by Piter Kehoma Boll

ResearchBlogging.orgLast week I introduced a land planarian that feeds on land snails, Obama ladislavii, or, as I called it, the Ladislau’s flatworm. Therefore, today, I thought it would be great to present a similar situation occurring backwards: a land snail that feeds on land planarians.

So let me introduce this little predator, the land snail Rectartemon depressus. Again, it is not a widely known species and thus it has no common names, but why not call it the ‘orange jaguar snail’? Species of the genus Euglandina, which are also predatory snails, are called ‘wolf snails’ by comparing them to a common predator in North America. As Rectartemon species are common in South America, we could perfectly call them ‘jaguar snails’, right?

Rectartemon depressus about to capture a land planarian Obama marmorata. Photo from Lemos et al., 2012

Rectartemon depressus about to capture a land planarian Obama marmorata. Photo extracted from Lemos et al., 2012

Found in areas of Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil, the orange jaguar snail has a yellow to orange body and a whitish shell. It is listed a vulnerable species in the Brazilian Red List, but it is not mentioned in the IUCN’s Red List.

Initially known as a predator of other land gastropods, the orange jaguar snail revealed a new item in its diet recently. During attempts to find the food items in the diet of some land planarians from southern Brazil, the orange jaguar snail was offered as a food option, but while the expectations were that the planarian would eat the snail, the opposite happened! After contacting the land planarian, the snail simply grasps it with its radula (the snail’s toothed tongue) and sucks it in very quickly, just as if it were eating a noodle!

The orange jaguar snail eagerly consumes several land planarians, both native and exotic species. It makes it one of the first known predators of land planarians. One of its prey is the Ladislau’s flatworm, so we have a snail that eats a flatworm that eats snails!

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References:

Lemos, V., Canello, R., & Leal-Zanchet, A. 2012. Carnivore mollusks as natural enemies of invasive land flatworms. Annals of Applied Biology, 161 (2), 127-131 DOI: 10.1111/j.1744-7348.2012.00556.x

Santos, S. B., Miyahira, I. C., Mansur, M. C. D. 2013. Freshwater and terrestrial molluscs in Brasil: current status of knowledge and conservation. Tentacle, 21, 40-42.

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Filed under Behavior, Conservation, Ecology, Friday Fellow